Talking about violence for the first time

Being honest with yourself about what has been happening is the first big step towards making the change that needs to happen. The second big step is telling someone else about what’s been happening.

Being honest with yourself about what has been happening is the first big step towards making the change that needs to happen. The second big step is telling someone else about what’s been happening.

 

“It takes a lot of courage to open up and talk about violence.”

 

Some people, when first opening up about abuse and domestic violence dive right in at the deep end. They admit they’ve been abusive, that they don’t like what’s been happening, and that they want to do something about it.

Other people are more tentative, edging their way towards the real issue. They might say there’s been a lot of arguments. That sometimes things get pretty heated. As the discussion goes on they add in more information. They get so frustrated when things don’t go their way. That sometimes there’s pushing and shoving, or other forms of control. And so on.

For many people it takes a few attempts before they are able to open up.

If you feel ready to open up, you can speak with a trained professional at MensLine Australia on 1300 78 99 78. Our counsellors are trained to understand you may be feeling embarrassed and ashamed and won’t add to those feelings.

Nothing will change until you speak up. It’s tough to talk, but you can do it. You have the choice to change.

 

If you need to talk to someone, give one of our MensLine Australia counsellors a call on 1300 78 99 78 or access free video and online counselling.

More from domestic and family violence

Understanding spiritual abuse

Domestic violence can take many forms – it can include emotional, financial, physical, sexual and verbal. abuse. One of the lesser known forms of this behaviour is spiritual abuse, also known as religious abuse. Spiritual or Religious abuse can include control of another person’s religious choices and beliefs, as well as using religious beliefs to rationalise control over another person.

Read more

Understanding sexual abuse

Sexual abuse is a form of domestic violence, which can be defined as unwanted sexual activity. This activity is not just physical – it can also include verbal & emotional elements. Understand the signs and effects of sexual abuse and how to get help.

Read more

Understanding physical abuse

Domestic violence can take many forms – it can include emotional, financial, sexual, spiritual, verbal abuse. The most commonly known is physical abuse, with 16% of women (1.5 million) and 5.9% of men (528,800) in Australia. Here we look at some signs of physical abuse, as well as some steps to address it.

Read more

Understanding financial abuse

Domestic and family violence can take many forms – it can include many different types of behaviour including emotional, physical, sexual, spiritual and verbal abuse. One form of domestic violence which is often overlooked is financial abuse.

Read more

Understanding emotional abuse

Domestic and family violence can take many forms. One common, and often unrecognised, form of domestic violence is emotional abuse, which is an ongoing pattern of behaviour intended to cause emotional harm.

Read more

Understanding physical abuse

Domestic violence can take many forms – it can include emotional, financial, sexual, spiritual, verbal abuse. The most commonly known is physical abuse, with 16% of women (1.5 million) and 5.9% of men (528,800) in Australia. Here we look at some signs of physical abuse, as well as some steps to address it.

Read more

Understanding financial abuse

Domestic and family violence can take many forms – it can include many different types of behaviour including emotional, physical, sexual, spiritual and verbal abuse. One form of domestic violence which is often overlooked is financial abuse.

Read more

Understanding emotional abuse

Domestic and family violence can take many forms. One common, and often unrecognised, form of domestic violence is emotional abuse, which is an ongoing pattern of behaviour intended to cause emotional harm.

Read more