Changing for Good

The Changing For Good program provides counselling for men who want to develop healthy, respectful relationships with others.

Changing for Good is a program that seeks to maintain behaviours learned during a traditional behaviour change program, or introduce or re-introduce the key concepts and behaviours of sustained behaviour change. We work with men to help them recognise their abusive behaviours and end their use of violence.

By providing ongoing support, specialist counselling and resources, our goal is to help men make, and sustain changes in violent or abusive behaviours as well as attitudes that support violent behaviours.

By working with men to end their use of violence, we help to increase the safety of women and children who have or are experiencing domestic or family violence.

Changing for Good is a free service of MensLine Australia, the national telephone and online support, information and referral service for men with family and relationship concerns. MensLine Australia and Changing for Good are part of the On the Line network.

 

Who we help

Changing for Good provides free telephone counselling to any men who want help to end their use of violence in their relationships. This includes:

  • Men who want support to make violence free choices in the way they interact with the people they care for
  • Men who want to continue the work they have started at their Men’s Behaviour Change program
  • Prefer telephone counselling to traditional modes of delivery.

 

How it works

Men can register their interest in the program, by filling out an expression of interest form, or leaving their contact details by calling 1300 015 120. A counsellor will then get in contact, explaining more about the program and address any questions. At this ‘intake’ stage, a counsellor will enquire about the needs of the client.

 

Changing for Good is funded by the Australian Government Department of Social Services.

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